Virtue-Seppuku

Virtue-Seppuku

pepeseppuku.jpg

 

September 11, 2017

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The media portrayal of the fallout from Charlotte has universally followed a playbook that is familiar to 2016 Trump supporters: portray Trump as a racist to foment the narrative that, by extension, his followers are all torch-wielding Neo-Nazis. The fact this tactic backfired spectacularly then seems to have little impact on the current thinking in DNC/MSM strategy sessions, though it is widely acknowledged the Democrat Entertainment Complex suffers a dearth of creativity and innovative thinking in legitimate business endeavors and criminal enterprises alike. What makes this iteration interesting is the degree to which it reveals the boardrooms of corporate America are awaft in the same heady fumes of righteous moral superiority.

Many of these corporations are learning or re-learning the lessons of the election of 2016: that the elites are hopelessly out of touch and this negatively impacts their bottom line. In other words, it does not make any kind of business sense to alienate and demonize half the population for their positions because those same people not only make up your customers, but also your workforce.

Notable examples from the prior year include Target and Macy’s — two stores which touched off a series of debilitating boycotts after insultingly attempting to correct the wrong think of their clientele. Target incurred wrath after concerned parents who criticized its transgender bathroom and changing room policies were informed that they were backward bigots who just needed to get with the times. Macy’s angered the American voter when they discontinued Trump-branded merchandise as a show solidarity with non-citizen criminals. Both stores were in precarious positions to begin with. As brick-and-mortar establishments competing with online retailers, their futures were already uncertain. Ever more reason to avoid the sort of “divisive” language doctrinaire liberals fault conservatives for engaging in.

Neither store recovered the losses suffered through the senseless and unnecessary virtue-signaling. In a sign of liberal executive infallibility, Target never once in any of its quarterly or annual reports acknowledged that such a boycott existed, instead faulting their numbers on uncontrollable factors such as the weather. Macy’s to this day refuses to sell Trump cologne but refused to remove Ivanka Trump’s dress line despite Nordstrom and Neiman Marcus’ disavowals of the presidentially-tainted fabrics. Someone somewhere appears to have learned something. But does that mean the message is getting out? Sadly, this appears not to be the case.

Since then, numerous other inc-corp-cos have committed the same or similar unforced errors. In every case, the c-suite pandered their warped ideas of what the definition of hip customers by sending out some signal of hatred, disgust, or moral outrage regarding conservatives, conservative ideas, or Dr. President Trump. These have taken the form of off-the-record statements made by execs during corporate town halls or “misconstrued” remarks to the press. The extreme examples took the form of self-destructive admonitions that conservatives should not consider themselves customers as the CEO of Camping World did when he told CNBC that people who agree with Trump need not darken his doorstep telling them, “frankly, don’t shop at my business.” (He has since issued a non-apology.) That he felt comfortable at all making such a blanket characterization is indicative of the effects of the thinner atmosphere afflicting the corporate penthouse class in general.

But it is not just the customer base angered and alienated by the routine showcasing of leftist emotionalism. It is also the workers and staff who serve these very same corporate offices. Behold one James Damore, the Ph.d.-holding Google engineer who was de-anonymized, de-legitimized, and de-employed by the Happiest Workplace on Earth (™). James, whose job entailed solving the unsolvable by thinking the unthinkable was fired for just that: he thought a prohibited thought.

It is too early to tell what sort of an effect this form of institutionalized bigotry will have on the future of Google but only a fool would believe the way in which the company handled the situation will help in the end. His ideas were not unpopular in the company’s anonymous chat room, which indicates two terrible truths about life at tech fiefdom. 1) There is a large contingent of unbelievers, especially among those holding STEM qualifications, laboring in the
belly of the beast and 2) they are operating as “closeted” employees working in fear of being outed. Indications are these sentiments of disenfranchisement are growing in Silicon Valley.

The above leads an inescapable conclusion: that Trump voters are real and they occupy a considerable percentage, if not majority, of the population. This simple fact is proving impossible to incept into the skulls of elites. But no healthy organization, corporation or otherwise, can expect to function normally when 20 to 60 percent of its employees are made to feel like second-class human beings for having the wrong ideas, beliefs, or concerns if they differ from their superiors.

The fact this dynamic exists throws into doubt decades of corporate buy-in over the secular virtues of diversity and inclusion. The only solution is to reevaluate the programs and initiatives built thereupon — a task made difficult by the corporate political atmosphere and the bureaucracies these programs have spawned. This puts everyone in a bind. Intelligent leadership will be actively thwarted by their own well-meaning employees while executives slower on the uptake will continue campaigns of ideological correction and needlessly lose millions or possibly billions in aggregate stock value in the foreseeable future on virtue-seppuku.

 

 

by Feanor Lambrecht

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